Friday, February 24, 2006

marble mania!


No drawings to post, but here are some marbles I made last night....
The center vortex marble has a small opal in the middle....
Size ranges from one inch to about 1.5 inches....borosilicate glass.....

27 comments:

countfunkula1 said...

Nagi Beautiful!!!! You are the marble queen. Ribbit!

walleye said...

Nagi...you are the "Real" artist of the bunch...I am in awe of your talent. What a great idea to post your glass work. I'd love to see more!
Fantastic

nagi said...

Aw shucks guys, thanks!
I am in awe of all y'all!

Skribbl said...

Holy Carp! Bee-yoo-tee-full!!!

If I ever lose an eyeball can I get you to make a purdy one for me??? Seriously.

countfunkula1 said...

I'm with walleye.

Danny said...

Hi Storyboardom,

is there any way i could contact you via mail? Have some questions about storyboarding, the industry in l.a. in general and maybe you could help me on that..

many thank-you's,
greetings,
danny.
dploechinger@gmx.de

nagi said...

Hey Skrib-
For you, anything! Though I may not be able to resist making it glow in the dark or something....

walleye said...

Glow in the dark eyeball!!! Can I get one! Can I!! Can I!!!

nagi said...

Sure Walleye!

Jim M. said...

That one on the far right is disturbingly beautiful... It looks like a deadly aquatic plant that lures in fish with a dance of the 7 veils.

or somethin'.

nagi said...

LOL!
Thanks Jim!

the doodlers said...

Kudos Nagi. These are stunning. Can you explain the process of making them a bit?

willipino said...

amazing!

RoboTaeKwon-Z said...

Hmmm, commetnt deleted...I wonder who that was.
Hmmmm.
Nagi, anyone who can make a freakin' MARBLE has my undying respect!

walleye said...

Hey Robo, I can make a marble too...but you don't want to know how. Takes a lot of cheese.
Nagi has all the talent.

nagi said...

thanks everyone!
Robo--I missed the fun! Was researching gadolinium.......
to the doodlers:
I take a large rod of clear glass and melt it to make a ball. Then I flatten the ball and draw on it.....when I melt it back into the ball shape, the design gets pulled into the middle of the marble.
Then I decorate the back and round up the shape and voila! Marbles!
The average time to make one marble is around one hour..:-)

The glass comes in colored rods and looks like hard candy--it is sooo pretty! I melt them in a glass torch that goes up to around 2400 degrees Fahrenheit. After I make the bead or marble, I kiln anneal it to reduce the stress that is created in shaping.
A dramatic example of stress in glass is the Prince Rupert's Drop. You can hammer the drop and it will not crack but break the end off the tail and it explodes into dust:
http://www.museumofglass.org/VHS/video/rupert_drop_demo_bb.html

Jim M. said...

What do you draw on it with?

THRAXISjr said...

Show more glass stuff! We know you have it!!!

countfunkula1 said...

More glass! more glass!

nagi said...

Thanks for your encouragement everyone!
I'll post more :-)
Hi Jim-
I draw patterns on the clear glass with colored glass pulled thin(called stringer). Sometimes I will make special canes of colors twisted together to give different effects. Kinda looks like the canes made in ribbon candy.
You can also vaporize metals onto the surface of the glass to get different effects, kinda like a hologram. This takes alot of skill to get just right--too much metal and it goes opaque, too little and it'll burn off. Temperature and flame chemistry are also in play and it takes a while to learn how to "read" the glass. I'm still a beginner but it is soo addicting--I feel like a mad scientist. Currently, I am using silver and gold but I'm looking into other metals like copper and iron oxides and antimony....also looking into gadolinium powder to add sparklies. It's a fun hobby! :-)

Smook said...

Very beautiful glass works! And that's your 'second' talent? WOW, impressive, most impressive. How do you find the time after boarding all day??!!?

nagi said...

Thanks smook!
I find that they feed each other. Storyboarding is energizing-- especially when you are around such amazing talent!
Yeah, some days I am too tired or it's too hot or cold, and sometimes I do get the after dinner/sleepy belly/curl up on the couch/watch TV syndrome, but I am addicted to glass and try to squeeze it in whenever I can.
On days when I don't have time to run the kiln, I prep--make canes, clean the studio, plan my designs or read up on techniques or color. Oh, and spend countless hours admiring the work of the glass greats! If you haven't seen any work from the underground glass movement, check it out at www.glassartists.org.
Alot of the cool new techniques and colors in borosilicate glass came about from demand in the pipes industry. American artists decided to break the silence of the glass trade to share with each other and push glass in new directions.
Okay....soapbox time....if you're not interested, please don't read this:
This movement is American born--but threatened now by a mass import wave of knockoffs(thanks GW!). American made glass IS more expensive--the supplies and equipment needed for lampwork are expensive($40-60/pound for boro...some colors can go as high as $500/pound!), safety is really expensive and American made glass is kiln annealed to make it stronger. Most US artists do not work in a glass factory--they work out of small studios or out of their homes.
Other countries save money by using cheaper, low quality glass (cracks easier), not kiln annealing their glass(breaks easier), not ensuring the safety and health of their workers, and underpricing to cut the competition out of the picture. Take the typical $5 strand of imported glass beads. It might take an individual 3-4 hours to make that strand....add fuel costs of torch and kiln, and cost of materials,equipment, shipping, advertising.... and, well, you see why it isn't cost effective for anyone in the US to compete!

Glass manufacturers are also having a tough time. American glass is tested and screened using the newest technology and highest standards(=expensive). Secret, expensive additives are used for further clarity and compatibility. Some other countries don't hold their glass to such exacting standards. Recently, one country has lowered the price of clear glass so much that Pyrex gave up and stopped making art glass rods. The other 2 US clear glass producers, Kimble and Schott are very pricey and headed in that direction. They are getting harder and harder to find as the imported glass takes over the market. Alot of glasssblowers are barely making a living and have to cut corners to survive. Many have jobs to support their glassblowing.
I try to buy from American manufacturers as much as possible(almost impossible with soft glass), and though I am not a flag waving patriot, I do ask you to please consider buying American when you can. What's happening in glass is happening in so many fields. Walmartization will lead to extinction of US manufacturers..... Sometimes cheaper is not always better for America.....
tirade over.....thanks for listening to my hot air!

countfunkula1 said...

You should post this on the kagematch too nagi!

nagi said...

ok!

Smook said...

WOW! You seem like a very passionate person and good for you! I admit to not knowing ANYTHING about glass making, but you have given me a bit more insight into the process and politics of it. Thanks.

I remember when I was at Sheridan, we did a life drawing class in the glass studio as they were firing the kilns, didn't really draw that day, watching the students making their assignments was far more interesting at the time.

Thanks for sharing! Looking forward to seeing more.

nagi said...

Thanks for putting up with me smook!
I am super passionate about glass and animation(and painting too) and sometimes I go off the deep end! But it's all in good fun, love and snuggles!

Bearuh said...

WOWWWWWW how do you make them